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52nd CES stops F-16 Fighting Falcon in its track

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Alexander Schell, 52nd Civil Engineering Squadron power production and aircraft arresting system supervisor, drags arresting cable into position with the help of Senior Airman Garrett Mathews, 52nd CES power production journeyman, at Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany, June 10, 2020. The cable is part of an active aircraft arresting system, which is a hydraulic braking system used in an emergency, to rapidly decelerate a jet as it lands on the runway. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Branden Rae)

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Cody Harris, 52nd Civil Engineering Squadron power production journeyman, sets the proper hydraulic pressure for the arresting system on the runway at Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany, June 10, 2020. The purpose of an active aircraft arresting system is to assist in rapidly decelerating aircraft during emergency situations. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Branden Rae)

U.S Air Force Staff Sgt. Alexander Schell, 52nd Civil Engineering Squadron power production and aircraft arresting system supervisor, tightens a bolt to connect the cable and tape for the arresting system on the flightline at Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany, June 10, 2020. The arresting system slows and stops aircraft using a metal cable running across the runway that's attached to hydraulic braking systems on either side of the runway. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Branden Rae)

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Cody Harris, 52nd Civil Engineering Squadron power production journeyman, positions spacing donuts along an arresting cable on the runway at Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany, June 10, 2020. The rubber spacing donuts elevate the arresting cable two inches off the runway, providing space for an aircraft's tailhook to catch the cable during an emergency landing. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Branden Rae)

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Garrett Mathews, 52nd Civil Engineering Squadron power production journeyman, forefront, ties the arresting cable to the runway at Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany, June 10, 2020. Nylon ropes secure the cable and to the runway to keep the cable from interfering with normal operations, but during an emergency the nylon line breaks away easily when a jet uses the arresting system. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Branden Rae)

U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcon conducts testing for the recertification of the arresting system on the runway at Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany, June 11, 2020. This annual test and certification ensures the system's hydraulics, cable and tape are operational and safe for use in case of emergency. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Branden Rae)

U.S. Air Force crash recovery team inspects the hook and cable of the arresting system during a recertification test on the runway at Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany, June 11, 2020. The arresting system uses the aircraft's tailhook to safely decelerate and stop the aircraft when a short distance landing is required. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Branden Rae)

U.S. Air Force Airmen check for cracks in the arresting system tape after the system's recertification on the runway at Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany, June 11, 2020. The arresting system's tape can extend up to 1,200 feet, providing enough space to slow and stop an aircraft in an emergency. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Branden Rae)

SPANGDAHLEM AIR BASE, Germany --