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86 MXS extracts C-130H fuel tank for training

A photo of an aircraft resting in a hangar.

A C-130H Hercules ground trainer aircraft rests in a hangar at Ramstein Air Base, Germany, June 15, 2020. The 86th Maintenance Squadron removed fuel tanks from each wing of the aircraft to use for confined space training. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Taylor D. Slater)

A photo of an Airman searching for tools.

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Colby Moore, 86th Maintenance Squadron aircraft fuel systems journeyman, searches through a toolbox at Ramstein Air Base, Germany, June 15, 2020. Moore and his colleagues extracted fuel tanks from a C-130H Hercules ground trainer aircraft to utilize later as confined space trainers for on-the-job instruction. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Taylor D. Slater)

A photo of Airmen working on an aircraft.

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Jubal Johnson, 86th Maintenance Squadron aircraft fuel systems craftsman, left, and Senior Airman Colby Moore, 86th MXS aircraft fuel systems journeyman, work on a C-130H Hercules ground trainer aircraft at Ramstein Air Base, Germany, June 15, 2020. After extracting fuel tanks from the aircraft, several maintenance sections will be able to repurpose them for training, including aircraft fuel systems repair, sheet metals, metals technicians, and non-destructive inspections. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Taylor D. Slater)

An Airman works on an aircraft.

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Jubal Johnson, 86th Maintenance Squadron fuel systems craftsman, assists in extracting a fuel tank from a C-130H Hercules ground trainer aircraft at Ramstein Air Base, Germany, June 15, 2020. The C-130H Hercules fuel tank extraction project began in December 2019, and when completed, will be used as a confined space trainer for the squadron. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Taylor D. Slater)

A photo of Airmen working on an aircraft.

U.S. Airmen assigned to the 86th Maintenance Squadron lower a C-130H Hercules ground trainer aircraft fuel tank into a stand at Ramstein Air Base, Germany, June 15, 2020. The aircraft fuel systems repair section designed and built stands to house the fuel tank. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Taylor D. Slater)

A photo of an Airman working on an aircraft.

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Colby Moore, 86th Maintenance Squadron aircraft fuel systems journeyman, lowers a C-130H Hercules ground trainer aircraft fuel tank at Ramstein Air Base, Germany, June 15, 2020. The additional hands-on training from the extracted fuel tanks is estimated to save the Air Force up to $700,000. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Taylor D. Slater)

A photo of an Airman reading a technical order.

U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Jakeb Hurley, 86th Airlift Wing non-commissioned officer in charge of wing plans and programs, reads a technical order for a C-130H Hercules ground trainer aircraft at Ramstein Air Base, Germany, June 15, 2020. Hurley returned temporarily to the aircraft fuel systems repair section to see the C-130H Hercules fuel tank extraction project to its completion. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Taylor D. Slater)

A photo of Airmen posing for a photo.

Left to right: U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Jubal Johnson, 86th Maintenance Squadron aircraft fuel systems craftsman, left, Tech. Sgt. Jakeb Hurley, 86th Airlift Wing non-commissioned officer in charge of wing plans and programs, center, and Senior Airman Colby Moore, 86th MXS aircraft fuel systems journeyman, pose for a photo after extracting a fuel tank from a C-130H Hercules ground trainer aircraft at Ramstein Air Base, Germany, June 15, 2020. The fuel tanks from the aircraft will increase the overall effectiveness of the 86th MXS by giving additional opportunities for training in confined spaces. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Taylor D. Slater)

RAMSTEIN AIR BASE, Germany --

The 86th Maintenance Squadron removed fuel tanks from each wing of a C-130H Hercules ground trainer aircraft June 15 to use for confined space training. The additional hands-on training from the extracted fuel tanks is estimated to save the Air Force up to $700,000.