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Water Wonder: 776th EABS install new facilities at Camp Simba

Tech. Sgts Jerl Dunn and Brendan Muchow, water and fuels system maintenance craftsmen for the 776th Expeditionary Air Base Squadron stand in front of their working area at Camp Simba at Manda Bay, May 19, 2021. Some of the responsibilities for Dunn and Muchow were to ensure that the waste and water systems at Camp Simba were in order and up to date alongside with the 475th Expeditionary Air Base Squadron civil engineers. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jan K. Valle)

Tech. Sgts Jerl Dunn and Brendan Muchow, water and fuels system maintenance craftsmen for the 776th Expeditionary Air Base Squadron stand in front of their working area at Camp Simba at Manda Bay, May 19, 2021. Some of the responsibilities for Dunn and Muchow were to ensure that the waste and water systems at Camp Simba were in order and up to date alongside with the 475th Expeditionary Air Base Squadron civil engineers. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jan K. Valle)

Tech. Sgts. Jerl Dunn and Brendan Muchow, water and fuels system maintenance craftsmen for the 776th Expeditionary Air Base Squadron connect a hose at Camp Simba at Manda Bay, May 19, 2021. The technicians installed several reverse osmosis water purification units (ROWPU) which are used to purify and sanitize water for drinking and personal hygiene use at Camp Simba.

Tech. Sgts. Jerl Dunn and Brendan Muchow, water and fuels system maintenance craftsmen for the 776th Expeditionary Air Base Squadron connect a hose at Camp Simba at Manda Bay, May 19, 2021. The technicians installed several reverse osmosis water purification units (ROWPU) which are used to purify and sanitize water for drinking and personal hygiene use at Camp Simba. (U. S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jan K. Valle)

CAMP LEMONNIER, Djibouti-- --

Tech. Sgt. Jerl Dunn and Tech. Sgt. Brendan Muchow, water and fuels system maintenance craftsmen for the 776th Expeditionary Air Base Squadron are installing new water systems to be used for Camp Simba at Manda Bay.

Some of the responsibilities for Dunn and Muchow include ensuring that the waste and water systems at Camp Simba are in order and up to date.

“The way we ensure mission readiness is by going through every piece of equipment, fixing any issues we find, and testing it by conducting operational checks,” Dunn said.

The reverse osmosis water purification unit) is a tool that purifies and sanitizes water for drinking and personal hygiene use.

“The ROWPUs take the raw water that is high in salt content and filters it by taking all the salt out and disinfecting the water,” Muchow said. “The water is then used for the bathrooms, showers, laundry facilities and kitchens.”

In about 13 hours a ROWPU can purify approximately 20 thousand gallons of water, according to Dunn.

“We have to make sure to fix any other issues while still purifying the water and our goal is to have at least 40 to 60 thousand gallons of water which can take us a couple of days,” he  said.

The 475th EABS civil engineers also contributed to this mission by installing a kit that comes with two latrines, shower units, waste system with a 25 thousand gallons tank, laundry facility and a box of repair tools and necessities.

 “We are grateful to the 475th EABS civil engineers for welcoming us with open arms and helping us accomplish this mission. Civil engineering is like a big family, we always help each other out.”

Installing the water filtration systems was one of the biggest undertakings Dunn and Muchow said they faced, but they also completed smaller projects at Chabelley Airfield in Djibouti.

“Some of the other missions that we also partook in would be relocating and building the new Military Working Dog compound, extension onto the medical facility at Chabelley,” said Dunn. “We helped in bunker hardening, installed a new 5 thousand gallons water tank for the showers and latrines, and also repurposed an old storage container into a work space for the Security Forces Military Working Dog personnel.

These are just some of our bigger projects we have had but we also try to help out with anything and everything around base.”

Without the help of Dunn and Muchow, the residents at Camp Simba would be limited to the resources available to them. With the installation of new kits, it gives more accessibility to the members stationed there and those to come.

“A lot of people stationed here have been supportive of us being here and installing these new systems for them to utilize,” Muchow said. “It definitely puts a lot of relief on the current facilities.”