HomeNewsArticle Display

4th CTS hosts first AGIC with African partners

A Nigerian air force pilot peers into a set of virtual reality goggles while conducting simulator training during the 4th Combat Training Squadron’s first Air to Ground Integration Course at Einsiedlerhof Air Station, Germany, Sept. 18, 2019. The course consisted of a week of classroom studies, a week of simulator training, and a capstone event where airmen controlled aircraft on a range.

A Nigerian air force pilot peers into a set of virtual reality goggles while conducting simulator training during the 4th Combat Training Squadron’s first Air to Ground Integration Course at Einsiedlerhof Air Station, Germany, Sept. 18, 2019. The course consisted of a week of classroom studies, a week of simulator training, and a capstone event where airmen controlled aircraft on a range.

Two Nigerian air force pilots pre-plan for a simulated training during the 4th Combat Training Squadron’s first Air to Ground Integration Course at Einsiedlerhof Air Station, Germany, Sept. 18, 2019. Service members from Nigeria and Tunisia attended the two-week course as an introduction to air to ground combat integration. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Jonathan Bass)

Two Nigerian air force pilots pre-plan for a simulated training during the 4th Combat Training Squadron’s first Air to Ground Integration Course at Einsiedlerhof Air Station, Germany, Sept. 18, 2019. Service members from Nigeria and Tunisia attended the two-week course as an introduction to air to ground combat integration. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Jonathan Bass)

Leaders from the Nigerian armed forces meet with the U.S. Air Forces in Europe-Air Forces Africa’s Warrior Preparation Center during the 4th Combat Training Squadron’s first Air to Ground Integration Course at Einsiedlerhof Air Station, Sept. 18, 2019. Service members from the Nigerian air force, army, and navy, along with a Tunisian air force member discussed their impressions of the course and the benefits of it with the WPC’s leadership. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Jonathan Bass)

Leaders from the Nigerian armed forces meet with the U.S. Air Forces in Europe-Air Forces Africa’s Warrior Preparation Center during the 4th Combat Training Squadron’s first Air to Ground Integration Course at Einsiedlerhof Air Station, Sept. 18, 2019. Service members from the Nigerian air force, army, and navy, along with a Tunisian air force member discussed their impressions of the course and the benefits of it with the WPC’s leadership. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Jonathan Bass)

A 4th Combat Training Squadron Air to Ground Integration Course instructor discusses a simulated training with his students during the 4th CTS’s first AGIC at Einsiedlerhof Air Station, Sept. 18, 2019. Service members from Nigeria’s and Tunisia’s armed forces attended the two-week course focused on an introduction to air to ground combat. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Jonathan Bass)

A 4th Combat Training Squadron Air to Ground Integration Course instructor discusses a simulated training with his students during the 4th CTS’s first AGIC at Einsiedlerhof Air Station, Sept. 18, 2019. Service members from Nigeria’s and Tunisia’s armed forces attended the two-week course focused on an introduction to air to ground combat. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Jonathan Bass)

A Nigerian air force pilot displays his MI-24 Hind patch during the 4th Combat Training Squadron’s first Air to Ground Integration Course at Einsiedlerhof Air Station, Germany, Sept. 18, 2019. The 4th CTS designed the course to teach partner nations how to introduce and employ air assets into a ground conflict. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Jonathan Bass)

A Nigerian air force pilot displays his MI-24 Hind patch during the 4th Combat Training Squadron’s first Air to Ground Integration Course at Einsiedlerhof Air Station, Germany, Sept. 18, 2019. The 4th CTS designed the course to teach partner nations how to introduce and employ air assets into a ground conflict. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Jonathan Bass)

RAMSTEIN AIR BASE, Germany --

The 4th Combat Training Squadron assigned to the Warrior Preparation Center at Einsiedlerhof Air Station, Germany, hosted Nigerian and Tunisian service members for the first iteration of a new two-week course, Sept. 9-20.

The Africans participated in the first Air to Ground Integration Course as part of a $300 million congressionally approved funding program. The course develops air to ground integration capabilities with African nation partners.

“Air to Ground integration is the coordinated air attack by fixed wing and rotary aircraft against hostile targets,” said Capt. Matthew Roberts, 4th CTS chief of plans and programs.

The United States is committed to partnering with African countries to address compatible strategic security objectives, added Staff Sgt. Roger Frederick, 4th CTS tactical air party craftsman.

Those objectives include combating destabilizing issues and violent extremist activities which could threaten regional security, Frederick continued.

“A course like this is important for interoperability,” said Roberts. “We need to be able to deploy air power forward across any continent with any of our partners and conduct the same operational and training possibilities downrange.”

The course consisted of a week of classroom studies, a week of simulator training, and a capstone event where airmen controlled aircraft on a range.

U.S. Air Forces Africa acts as a reliable military partner in Africa. They seek to be the security partner of choice by working with partnered security forces based on their operational needs, Frederick said.

“This course actually provides two-way learning,” Frederick said. “I know have a better understanding of how Nigeria employs their air force and it’s opened up perspective on how they integrate. I can take the lessons they’ve taught me and apply it to future scenarios.”

AFAFRICA conducts multilateral and mil-to-mil engagements and security assistance with African air forces in order to build aviation capacities, enhance regional cooperation, and increase interoperability.