Remembering the Fallen: A Military Heritage

U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. Michael Murieen, 52nd Civil Engineer Squadron section chief of water fuel and systems maintenance, salutes a headstone at the Luxembourg American Military Cemetery May 21, 2014, at Luxembourg City, Luxembourg. More than 5,000 American service members are interred at the cemetery. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Rusty Frank/Released)

U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. Michael Murieen, 52nd Civil Engineer Squadron section chief of water fuel and systems maintenance, salutes a headstone at the Luxembourg American Military Cemetery May 21, 2014, at Luxembourg City, Luxembourg. More than 5,000 American service members are interred at the cemetery. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Rusty Frank/Released)

SPANGDAHLEM AIR BASE, Germany - -- Editor's note: This is the first of a four part series of honoring our fallen heroes.

It's that time of year to reflect on events and people who helped shape the world today. Those brave actions and the people who accomplished them should never be forgotten said Master Sgt. Michael Murieen, 52nd Civil Engineer Squadron section chief of water and fuel systems maintenance.

For Murieen, it's become his passion to remember those fallen heroes.

"I think the inspiration came from the courage and determination of all those Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen and Marines who came before us and laid down their lives," said Murieen. "Being here where those battles actually happened is pretty moving to say the least."

Murieen has orchestrated or participated in many of remembrance events throughout the Eifel, these events included the Wereth 11 ceremony, the Dead Man's Ridge memorial ruck march honoring the actions of the 17th Airborne division during the Battle Bulge, and Operation
Market Garden. 

Murieen's drive to honor all of these fallen heroes started in 2012.

"I took a detail of seven people from my shop to join the rest of the Airmen from Spangdahlem for a Memorial Day ceremony at the Netherlands American Cemetery in Margraten," he said. "I thought that was the most moving military ceremony that I have ever seen or been a part of. I guess that's what spurred me to start looking for different events."

Murieen also tries to instill into his troops not to take for granted the opportunity to honor fallen heroes, because it is part of culture.

"I myself wanted to be a part of things here, and I wanted to involve my troops and make it important to them, and to always remember who came before us," he said. "I think that it's an important part of our heritage and culture that we--as members of the U.S. military--have to remember."